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Archive for February, 2008

Mrs Bennet in Pride and Prejudice is a mother with a mission. It is her sole object to have her daughters married well and she does all she can to achieve this end. At the beginning of Pride and Prejudice Mrs Bennet is keen for Mr Bennet to visit Mr Bingley, a rich neighbour who has recently moved to the area. Mr Bennet does not seem to strike up the acquaintance much to his wife’s vexation. She speaks first.

“But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it would be for one of them. Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go, merely on that account, for in general, you know, they visit no new-comers. Indeed you must go, for it will be impossible for us to visit him if you do not.”

“You are over-scrupulous surely. I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chuses of the girls: though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.”

“I desire you will do no such thing. Lizzy is not a bit better than the others; and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good-humoured as Lydia. But you are always giving her the preference.”

“They have none of them much to recommend them,” replied he; “they are all silly and ignorant, like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters.”

“Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way! You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion on my poor nerves.”

“You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.”

“Ah! you do not know what I suffer.”

“But I hope you will get over it, and live to see many young men of four thousand a year come into the neighbourhood.”

“It will be no use to us if twenty such should come, since you will not visit them.”

“Depend upon it, my dear, that when there are twenty, I will visit them all.”

This is such a funny scene, especially when it is soon revealed that Mr Bennet intends to visit Mr Bingley without telling them!

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Mrs Bennet

Mrs Bennet in Pride and Prejudice is a mother with a mission. It is her sole object to have her daughters married well and she does all she can to achieve this end. At the beginning of Pride and Prejudice Mrs Bennet is keen for Mr Bennet to visit Mr Bingley, a rich neighbour who has recently moved to the area. Mr Bennet does not seem to strike up the acquaintance much to his wife’s vexation. She speaks first.

“But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it would be for one of them. Sir William and Lady Lucas are determined to go, merely on that account, for in general, you know, they visit no new-comers. Indeed you must go, for it will be impossible for us to visit him if you do not.”

“You are over-scrupulous surely. I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chuses of the girls: though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.”

“I desire you will do no such thing. Lizzy is not a bit better than the others; and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good-humoured as Lydia. But you are always giving her the preference.”

“They have none of them much to recommend them,” replied he; “they are all silly and ignorant, like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters.”

“Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way! You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion on my poor nerves.”

“You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.”

“Ah! you do not know what I suffer.”

“But I hope you will get over it, and live to see many young men of four thousand a year come into the neighbourhood.”

“It will be no use to us if twenty such should come, since you will not visit them.”

“Depend upon it, my dear, that when there are twenty, I will visit them all.”

This is such a funny scene, especially when it is soon revealed that Mr Bennet intends to visit Mr Bingley without telling them!

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New letters have just been discovered giving evidence of a correspondence between our lovely Miss Lydia and what appears to be a close acquaintance, Miss Lucy. The first must have been sent just at the time two certain gentlemen, a Mr Bingley and his friend Mr Darcy, were visiting Meryton.

My dearest Lydia,

La, it is uncommonly hot today and not at all the sort of weather for this time of year! I am so glad we are arrived at Brighton, for the sea breezes are refreshingly cool. I am writing to you on the scent of a RUMOUR! My mama’s lady’s maid heard from the footman, who heard from the valet of a visiting gentleman, who had stopped by to deliver a letter from Sir William Lucas to my papa, that your eldest sister Jane is practically engaged to a man of great good fortune. They said your mama said so, and that Jane had met him not a fortnight ago!

When last we spoke, we were lamenting the lack of eligible and handsome young men in Meryton. Indeed, your mama was always wondering aloud how she would manage to marry you all off.

How did Jane find anyone so well connected so soon? What is his name? What is he like, and where is he from? My mama begs me to ask you if he came alone or with a friend. And if so, what is HE like?

Do write me as speedily as you can. And, pray, tell me EVERYTHING! We are all agog with excitement.

Your affectionate friend,
Lucy


My dearest Lucy,

La! I am so diverted to hear from you again but monstrous vexed to hear you are in Brighton where I should like to be. However, for all your unseasonable fine weather and seaside entertainments, I must tell you that I cannot envy you. Meryton was certainly very dull the last time we met but I write to you now with exciting news and gossip.

An entire regiment of soldiers are wintering here – can you believe it? Such dashing officers – such wonderful visions in scarlet! One can hardly step out into the High Street for bumping into a redcoat and they are most obliging!

However, I digress. You are quite right in supposing my mother to have been at her wit’s end with regard to finding my sisters a husband, but the arrival of a Mr Bingley to the neighbourhood may soon put mama and Jane out of misery. He is from the North, is very rich and gentleman-like but not really to my taste, so I am very happy to see my sister quite smitten. Mr Bingley has taken Netherfield Park, which my mother thinks will do very nicely indeed – we have not known him a fortnight yet my sister danced four times with him at the Meryton assembly and has dined in company with him at least the same number. But for all this amusement I have to tell you his society is blighted not only by his horrid sisters but by the presence of his vile friend Mr Darcy, the most disagreeable man you ever beheld. Mama says he has ten thousand pounds but it seems to me that his money has not been of any help in making his disposition happy. I have never seen such a sour-faced countenance!

I must dash – Denny and Chamberlayne have just called –

Write again soon with your news,

Fondest felicitations,

Lydia

‘Lucy’ is perhaps better known as Ms. Place from Jane Austen Today and Jane Austen’s World. We’ve had a lot of fun putting these together. I hope you enjoy them!

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New letters have just been discovered giving evidence of a correspondence between our lovely Miss Lydia and what appears to be a close acquaintance, Miss Lucy. The first must have been sent just at the time two certain gentlemen, a Mr Bingley and his friend Mr Darcy, were visiting Meryton.

My dearest Lydia,

La, it is uncommonly hot today and not at all the sort of weather for this time of year! I am so glad we are arrived at Brighton, for the sea breezes are refreshingly cool. I am writing to you on the scent of a RUMOUR! My mama’s lady’s maid heard from the footman, who heard from the valet of a visiting gentleman, who had stopped by to deliver a letter from Sir William Lucas to my papa, that your eldest sister Jane is practically engaged to a man of great good fortune. They said your mama said so, and that Jane had met him not a fortnight ago!

When last we spoke, we were lamenting the lack of eligible and handsome young men in Meryton. Indeed, your mama was always wondering aloud how she would manage to marry you all off.

How did Jane find anyone so well connected so soon? What is his name? What is he like, and where is he from? My mama begs me to ask you if he came alone or with a friend. And if so, what is HE like?

Do write me as speedily as you can. And, pray, tell me EVERYTHING! We are all agog with excitement.

Your affectionate friend,
Lucy


My dearest Lucy,

La! I am so diverted to hear from you again but monstrous vexed to hear you are in Brighton where I should like to be. However, for all your unseasonable fine weather and seaside entertainments, I must tell you that I cannot envy you. Meryton was certainly very dull the last time we met but I write to you now with exciting news and gossip.

An entire regiment of soldiers are wintering here – can you believe it? Such dashing officers – such wonderful visions in scarlet! One can hardly step out into the High Street for bumping into a redcoat and they are most obliging!

However, I digress. You are quite right in supposing my mother to have been at her wit’s end with regard to finding my sisters a husband, but the arrival of a Mr Bingley to the neighbourhood may soon put mama and Jane out of misery. He is from the North, is very rich and gentleman-like but not really to my taste, so I am very happy to see my sister quite smitten. Mr Bingley has taken Netherfield Park, which my mother thinks will do very nicely indeed – we have not known him a fortnight yet my sister danced four times with him at the Meryton assembly and has dined in company with him at least the same number. But for all this amusement I have to tell you his society is blighted not only by his horrid sisters but by the presence of his vile friend Mr Darcy, the most disagreeable man you ever beheld. Mama says he has ten thousand pounds but it seems to me that his money has not been of any help in making his disposition happy. I have never seen such a sour-faced countenance!

I must dash – Denny and Chamberlayne have just called –

Write again soon with your news,

Fondest felicitations,

Lydia

‘Lucy’ is perhaps better known as Ms. Place from Jane Austen Today and Jane Austen’s World. We’ve had a lot of fun putting these together. I hope you enjoy them!

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I hope you have all enjoyed the Pride and Prejudice adaptation that has just finished on TV in the US. I loved this version and I thought Julia Sawalha was a fantastic Lydia, petulant and precocious but still managing to be very funny! Adrian Lukis was perfect for Wickham too, just the right combination of charm and charisma to convince us in the beginning that he is an ideal partner for Lizzy but also imbued with a certain sleaziness, which soon shows us his true character. Poor Lydia cannot see this and believes herself to be in love with him. Whatever her faults, I could not let Lydia be miserable with Mr Wickham for the rest of her life – I had to find a happy ending for her in Lydia Bennet’s Story!
Jennifer Ehle as Elizabeth Bennet was a wonderful Lizzy and I’m sure most will agree that Colin Firth is unsurpassed as Mr Darcy. I think the on screen chemistry between these two is what sparked so many web sites, blogs and sequels to Pride and Prejudice in the years since its first airing. I remember talking to Ann Channon at Jane Austen’s House in Chawton when this adaptation first came out. She said that the building could scarcely cope with the huge numbers of people that wanted to find out more about the author who had written Pride and Prejudice; they were inundated with visitors. One entry in the visitor’s book made Ann laugh-they noted the house was very nice but asked ‘where is Mr Darcy?’

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I hope you have all enjoyed the Pride and Prejudice adaptation that has just finished on TV in the US. I loved this version and I thought Julia Sawalha was a fantastic Lydia, petulant and precocious but still managing to be very funny! Adrian Lukis was perfect for Wickham too, just the right combination of charm and charisma to convince us in the beginning that he is an ideal partner for Lizzy but also imbued with a certain sleaziness, which soon shows us his true character. Poor Lydia cannot see this and believes herself to be in love with him. Whatever her faults, I could not let Lydia be miserable with Mr Wickham for the rest of her life – I had to find a happy ending for her in Lydia Bennet’s Story!
Jennifer Ehle as Elizabeth Bennet was a wonderful Lizzy and I’m sure most will agree that Colin Firth is unsurpassed as Mr Darcy. I think the on screen chemistry between these two is what sparked so many web sites, blogs and sequels to Pride and Prejudice in the years since its first airing. I remember talking to Ann Channon at Jane Austen’s House in Chawton when this adaptation first came out. She said that the building could scarcely cope with the huge numbers of people that wanted to find out more about the author who had written Pride and Prejudice; they were inundated with visitors. One entry in the visitor’s book made Ann laugh-they noted the house was very nice but asked ‘where is Mr Darcy?’

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As in all good love stories the hero and heroine come together at last. The following is an extract from Pride and Prejudice where Elizabeth and Mr Darcy have finally realised how much they are in love with one another and make their feelings known.

Elizabeth’s spirits soon rising to playfulness again, she wanted Mr. Darcy to account for his having ever fallen in love with her. “How could you begin?” said she. “I can comprehend your going on charmingly, when you had once made a beginning; but what could set you off in the first place?”

“I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”

“My beauty you had early withstood, and as for my manners – my behaviour to you was at least always bordering on the uncivil, and I never spoke to you without rather wishing to give you pain than not. Now, be sincere; did you admire me for my impertinence?”

“For the liveliness of your mind, I did.”

“You may as well call it impertinence at once. It was very little less. The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious attention. You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused and interested you, because I was so unlike them. Had you not been really amiable, you would have hated me for it; but, in spite of the pains you took to disguise yourself, your feelings were always noble and just; and, in your heart, you thoroughly despised the persons who so assiduously courted you. There – I have saved you the trouble of accounting for it; and really, all things considered, I begin to think it perfectly reasonable. To be sure, you knew no actual good of me – but nobody thinks of that when they fall in love.”

“Was there no good in your affectionate behaviour to Jane, while she was ill at Netherfield?”

“Dearest Jane! who could have done less for her? But make a virtue of it by all means. My good qualities are under your protection, and you are to exaggerate them as much as possible; and in return, it belongs to me to find occasions for teasing and quarrelling with you as often as may be; and I shall begin directly, by asking you what made you so unwilling to come to the point at last? What made you so shy of me when you first called, and afterwards dined here? Why, especially when you called, did you look as if you did not care about me?”

“Because you were grave and silent, and gave me no encouragement.”

“But I was embarrassed.”

“And so was I.”

“You might have talked to me more when you came to dinner.”

“A man who had felt less, might.”

“How unlucky that you should have a reasonable answer to give, and that I should be so reasonable as to admit it! But I wonder how long you would have gone on if you had been left to yourself! I wonder when you would have spoken, if I had not asked you! My resolution of thanking you for your kindness to Lydia had certainly great effect. — Too much, I am afraid; for what becomes of the moral, if our comfort springs from a breach of promise? for I ought not to have mentioned the subject. This will never do.”

“You need not distress yourself. The moral will be perfectly fair. Lady Catherine’s unjustifiable endeavours to separate us were the means of removing all my doubts. I am not indebted for my present happiness to your eager desire of expressing your gratitude. I was not in a humour to wait for any opening of yours. My aunt’s intelligence had given me hope, and I was determined at once to know everything.”

“Lady Catherine has been of infinite use, which ought to make her happy, for she loves to be of use. But tell me, what did you come down to Netherfield for? Was it merely to ride to Longbourn, and be embarrassed? or had you intended any more serious consequence?”

“My real purpose was to see you, and to judge, if I could, whether I might ever hope to make you love me. My avowed one, or what I avowed to myself, was to see whether your sister were still partial to Bingley, and, if she were, to make the confession to him which I have since made.”

“Shall you ever have courage to announce to Lady Catherine, what is to befall her?”

“I am more likely to want time than courage, Elizabeth. But it ought to be done; and if you will give me a sheet of paper, it shall be done directly.”

“And if I had not a letter to write myself, I might sit by you, and admire the evenness of your writing, as another young lady once did. But I have an aunt too who must not be longer neglected.”

All together-aahhhhhhh!

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