Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for December, 2008

I have never been so disappointed in all my life – all my dreams for a felicitous evening in Richard’s company have come to nought! I dressed myself with great care and thought I looked very pretty with my gold earrings dangling in my ears and Mary’s brooch secured where I knew Capt. C could not fail to notice or admire its soft curves and pink petals against my skin.
Fortunately much of the snow had melted by the time the coaches made their slow but steady progress through the frozen lanes to Meryton. Half of Meryton and half of the militia were there but alas and alack, no Richard, who had sent word and apologies to my aunt to say that the affliction of a sore throat that he had had the misfortune to contract before Christmas, was giving him great discomfort and that he was therefore obliged to stay at home.
I cannot express my dismay, especially as I had only seen Capt. C. at church this morning, where to all intents and purposes he appeared to be in the bloom of health. Poor love, he must be ill indeed and with no one to comfort him. I almost felt inclined to run down the street to his lodgings so that I could nurse him but I decided he would be dull company if his voice is gone and I could not suffer to do all the entertaining myself.
My only comfort is that Diana could not flirt with him all night as it turned out she was unable to attend the party too, as following her revels in the snow last evening, her snuffles had developed into a sore throat which from all reports sounded worse than Captain Carter’s.
Despite my disappointment, we had a lot of fun. We played Snapdragon, which I love, although I always manage to burn my fingers snatching the raisins from the flaming brandy. Bullet Pudding, another old favourite made everybody laugh and choke by turns, not to mention turning our faces ghostly white from dipping our heads into the flour. Denny made himself sick when in his haste to grasp the bullet between his teeth, he ingested rather more of the flour pudding than he would have liked. We had Blind Man’s Buff and Charades, which I think is always more amusing when I have the answers!
At eleven we gathered to hear the singers who were at the door, but they were so full of Christmas good cheer, that their drunken voices were all out of tune and never together. Kitty and I were immensely diverted and could not help but laugh, as a poor unfortunate who was struggling to keep upright, cast about for support, missed the arm of his friend and fell headlong into the snow.
Afterwards, as we returned to start the dancing, I passed under the mistletoe, just as Mr Wickham did. He immediately begged for a kiss and I have to record that it was not the filial peck that I expected. It was far from being unpleasant and if I am truthful, I must add that were he to request another I would happily oblige!

Lydia Bennet

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I have never been so disappointed in all my life – all my dreams for a felicitous evening in Richard’s company have come to nought! I dressed myself with great care and thought I looked very pretty with my gold earrings dangling in my ears and Mary’s brooch secured where I knew Capt. C could not fail to notice or admire its soft curves and pink petals against my skin.
Fortunately much of the snow had melted by the time the coaches made their slow but steady progress through the frozen lanes to Meryton. Half of Meryton and half of the militia were there but alas and alack, no Richard, who had sent word and apologies to my aunt to say that the affliction of a sore throat that he had had the misfortune to contract before Christmas, was giving him great discomfort and that he was therefore obliged to stay at home.
I cannot express my dismay, especially as I had only seen Capt. C. at church this morning, where to all intents and purposes he appeared to be in the bloom of health. Poor love, he must be ill indeed and with no one to comfort him. I almost felt inclined to run down the street to his lodgings so that I could nurse him but I decided he would be dull company if his voice is gone and I could not suffer to do all the entertaining myself.
My only comfort is that Diana could not flirt with him all night as it turned out she was unable to attend the party too, as following her revels in the snow last evening, her snuffles had developed into a sore throat which from all reports sounded worse than Captain Carter’s.
Despite my disappointment, we had a lot of fun. We played Snapdragon, which I love, although I always manage to burn my fingers snatching the raisins from the flaming brandy. Bullet Pudding, another old favourite made everybody laugh and choke by turns, not to mention turning our faces ghostly white from dipping our heads into the flour. Denny made himself sick when in his haste to grasp the bullet between his teeth, he ingested rather more of the flour pudding than he would have liked. We had Blind Man’s Buff and Charades, which I think is always more amusing when I have the answers!
At eleven we gathered to hear the singers who were at the door, but they were so full of Christmas good cheer, that their drunken voices were all out of tune and never together. Kitty and I were immensely diverted and could not help but laugh, as a poor unfortunate who was struggling to keep upright, cast about for support, missed the arm of his friend and fell headlong into the snow.
Afterwards, as we returned to start the dancing, I passed under the mistletoe, just as Mr Wickham did. He immediately begged for a kiss and I have to record that it was not the filial peck that I expected. It was far from being unpleasant and if I am truthful, I must add that were he to request another I would happily oblige!

Lydia Bennet

Read Full Post »

Happy Christmas!

Happy Christmas everyone – I hope you all have a lovely time and a very Happy New Year. May all your wishes come true!

with love,
Jane Odiwe

Read Full Post »

Happy Christmas!

Happy Christmas everyone – I hope you all have a lovely time and a very Happy New Year. May all your wishes come true!

with love,
Jane Odiwe

Read Full Post »

Friday, December 25th, 1801

Christmas Day

We trudged through the snow to Church, (Captain Carter winked at me across the aisle!) and then home to breakfast on hot rolls and fruit cake, taken with a cup of chocolate, for our delight. We exchanged presents and I have made a list of the wonderful gifts I have received –
Mama – a pair of gold earrings
Papa – a rosewood jewel box
Jane – a swansdown muff
Lizzy – a pair of gloves
Mary – a rosebud brooch
Kitty – a turquoise ring
They are the loveliest presents I have ever had! I just know that this is going to be the best Christmas ever!!!
We dined on turkey, beef and plum pudding at four and were the very picture of a merry Christmas party. Even Mary failed to get on my nerves today, although I daresay the partaking of a little wine helped me to endure her rantings tolerably well.
I have spent most of the day in delicious reverie, recounting to myself the events of last evening. Shivers of ecstasy tremble over me whenever I recall Capt. C’s touch as he took my hand in the dance.
Papa was most rude to suggest that late nights only stupefy the younger members of the family and he is threatening to keep us all from our party at my aunt’s, in favour of an early night. I cannot wait to see my beloved Captain; the hours pass too slowly!

Lydia Bennet

Read Full Post »

Friday, December 25th, 1801

Christmas Day

We trudged through the snow to Church, (Captain Carter winked at me across the aisle!) and then home to breakfast on hot rolls and fruit cake, taken with a cup of chocolate, for our delight. We exchanged presents and I have made a list of the wonderful gifts I have received –
Mama – a pair of gold earrings
Papa – a rosewood jewel box
Jane – a swansdown muff
Lizzy – a pair of gloves
Mary – a rosebud brooch
Kitty – a turquoise ring
They are the loveliest presents I have ever had! I just know that this is going to be the best Christmas ever!!!
We dined on turkey, beef and plum pudding at four and were the very picture of a merry Christmas party. Even Mary failed to get on my nerves today, although I daresay the partaking of a little wine helped me to endure her rantings tolerably well.
I have spent most of the day in delicious reverie, recounting to myself the events of last evening. Shivers of ecstasy tremble over me whenever I recall Capt. C’s touch as he took my hand in the dance.
Papa was most rude to suggest that late nights only stupefy the younger members of the family and he is threatening to keep us all from our party at my aunt’s, in favour of an early night. I cannot wait to see my beloved Captain; the hours pass too slowly!

Lydia Bennet

Read Full Post »

Lydia Bennet is not what one would consider an attractive character. “Vain, ignorant, idle, and absolutely uncontrolled!” her sister Elizabeth cries about her in a trying moment, and the reader tends to sympathize. Lydia does share DNA with Jane and Elizabeth, so it stands to reason that she must have some redeeming qualities; yet fan fiction writer after sequel writer (including your humble servant) uses Lydia only as a convenient punching bag and plot point. However, Jane Odiwe has given Lydia Bennet a plausible backstory that, if it doesn’t redeem her, at least gives her the benefit of the doubt; and a happier ending than one would expect, and happier than the cynical Janeite might think she probably deserves.

The first half of the book tells the events of Pride and Prejudice from Lydia’s point of view. She is wild for officers and sexually precocious. She fixes on George Wickham, and is disappointed when he goes after nasty, freckled Mary King and her ten thousand pounds. Wickham has much to answer for in this story. He awakens Lydia’s sexuality and takes advantage of a young girl in full hormonal overload. He knows exactly what he is doing, and while Lydia certainly knows better, anyone who remembers being fifteen and in the throes of one’s first relationship can perfectly understand how she is led astray by a manipulative, self-centered man. This part of the story is absorbing and well-written, sexy without being explicit, and like the best of such alternative-viewpoint Austen paraliterature, we get a new, thoughtful, and sympathetic perspective on a well-known, well-loved classic.

We all know the story: Lydia is married, her sisters are married, Mrs. Darcy and Mrs. Bingley live happily ever after and Lydia not so much. The End, right? But the tell-tale lack of compression of the pages tells us that the book is only half finished. There is more to come, and the second half of the book is where we fear some Janeites will have to work hard to suspend their disbelief. (We had to club ours into submission and lock it into the closet for a few hours.) The Wickhams’ marriage is much like one would expect: he gambles and whores around, and she alternates between self-delusion and pitching the occasional hissy fit. However, there is not much story there, so Ms. Odiwe tosses in a shocking twist that we’re sure Jane Austen never intended but allows her to give her heroine as happy an ending as she could want. While the second half is well-written and enjoyable, we fear many Janeites will find it too much out of canon. However, if the reader is comfortable with non-canonical Austen paraliterature, we think she will find Lydia Bennet’s Story an absorbing read; and those who think they are not comfortable with such stories might enjoy it in spite of themselves.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »