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Archive for October, 2009

In 1811, Jane Austen’s first novel, Sense and Sensibility was published on October 30th by Thomas Egerton. Jane paid for the privilege and awarded her publisher a commission on sales. She made a profit of £140 on the first edition, which sold all 750 printed copies by July 1813. A second edition was advertised in October 1813. Note the title page in the last illustration – there is no reference to Jane as the author. It simply states – By a Lady – it was not considered quite the done thing to be a lady novelist and so keeping her name a secret was preferred.
On April 25th of that year she was doing the last edits to her book. I love this snippet to Cassandra in a letter sent whilst she was staying at her brother Henry’s house in Sloane Street, London. If you remember, this was the brother who had married Eliza de Feuillide. Jane writes:

No, indeed, I am never too busy to think of S. and S. I can no more forget it than a mother can forget her sucking child; and I am much obliged to you for your inquiries. I have had two sheets to correct, but the last only brings us to Willoughby’s first appearance. Mrs. K. regrets in the most flattering manner that she must wait till May, but I have scarcely a hope of its being out in June. Henry does not neglect it; he has hurried the printer, and says he will see him again to-day. It will not stand still during his absence, it will be sent to Eliza.

Here is that passage describing Willoughby’s first appearance:

They set off. Marianne had at first the advantage, but a false step brought her suddenly to the ground, and Margaret, unable to stop herself to assist her, was involuntarily hurried along, and reached the bottom in safety.

A gentleman carrying a gun, with two pointers playing round him, was passing up the hill and within a few yards of Marianne, when her accident happened. He put down his gun and ran to her assistance. She had raised herself from the ground, but her foot had been twisted in the fall, and she was scarcely able to stand. The gentleman offered his services, and perceiving that her modesty declined what her situation rendered necessary, took her up in his arms without farther delay, and carried her down the hill. Then passing through the garden, the gate of which had been left open by Margaret, he bore her directly into the house, whither Margaret was just arrived, and quitted not his hold till he had seated her in a chair in the parlour.

Elinor and her mother rose up in amazement at their entrance, and while the eyes of both were fixed on him with an evident wonder and a secret admiration which equally sprung from his appearance, he apologized for his intrusion by relating its cause, in a manner so frank and so graceful, that his person, which was uncommonly handsome, received additional charms from his voice and expression. Had he been even old, ugly, and vulgar, the gratitude and kindness of Mrs. Dashwood would have been secured by any act of attention to her child; but the influence of youth, beauty, and elegance, gave an interest to the action which came home to her feelings.

Later on in her letter, Jane Austen describes a party that Henry and Eliza were giving for friends – it gives us a delicious insight into her world.

At half-past seven arrived the musicians in two hackney coaches, and by eight the lordly company began to appear. Among the earliest were George and Mary Cooke, and I spent the greater part of the evening very pleasantly with them. The drawing-room being soon hotter than we liked, we placed ourselves in the connecting passage, which was comparatively cool, and gave us all the advantage of the music at a pleasant distance, as well as that of the first view of every new comer.

I was quite surrounded by acquaintances, especially gentlemen; and what with Mr. Hampson, Mr. Seymour, Mr. W. Knatchbull, Mr. Guillemarde, Mr. Cure, a Captain Simpson, brother to the Captain Simpson, besides Mr. Walter and Mr. Egerton, in addition to the Cookes, and Miss Beckford, and Miss Middleton, I had quite as much upon my hands as I could do.

Poor Miss B. has been suffering again from her old complaint, and looks thinner than ever. She certainly goes to Cheltenham the beginning of June. We were all delight and cordiality of course. Miss M. seems very happy, but has not beauty enough to figure in London.

Including everybody we were sixty-six – which was considerably more than Eliza had expected, and quite enough to fill the back drawing-room and leave a few to be scattered about in the other and in the passage.

The music was extremely good. It opened (tell Fanny) with “Poike de Parp pirs praise pof Prapela”; and of the other glees I remember, “In peace love tunes,” “Rosabelle,” “The Red Cross Knight,” and “Poor Insect.” Between the songs were lessons on the harp, or harp and pianoforte together; and the harp-player was Wiepart, whose name seems famous, though new to me. There was one female singer, a short Miss Davis, all in blue, bringing up for the public line, whose voice was said to be very fine indeed; and all the performers gave great satisfaction by doing what they were paid for, and giving themselves no airs. No amateur could be persuaded to do anything.

The house was not clear till after twelve. If you wish to hear more of it, you must put your questions, but I seem rather to have exhausted than spared the subject.

Willoughby’s Return is to be published officially tomorrow. If Jane was half as excited about her publication she must have been happy indeed!

Illustrations:
Jane Austen, Henry Austen by Jane Odiwe
Title page of Sense and Sensibility

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In 1811, Jane Austen’s first novel, Sense and Sensibility was published on October 30th by Thomas Egerton. Jane paid for the privilege and awarded her publisher a commission on sales. She made a profit of £140 on the first edition, which sold all 750 printed copies by July 1813. A second edition was advertised in October 1813. Note the title page in the last illustration – there is no reference to Jane as the author. It simply states – By a Lady – it was not considered quite the done thing to be a lady novelist and so keeping her name a secret was preferred.
On April 25th of that year she was doing the last edits to her book. I love this snippet to Cassandra in a letter sent whilst she was staying at her brother Henry’s house in Sloane Street, London. If you remember, this was the brother who had married Eliza de Feuillide. Jane writes:

No, indeed, I am never too busy to think of S. and S. I can no more forget it than a mother can forget her sucking child; and I am much obliged to you for your inquiries. I have had two sheets to correct, but the last only brings us to Willoughby’s first appearance. Mrs. K. regrets in the most flattering manner that she must wait till May, but I have scarcely a hope of its being out in June. Henry does not neglect it; he has hurried the printer, and says he will see him again to-day. It will not stand still during his absence, it will be sent to Eliza.

Here is that passage describing Willoughby’s first appearance:

They set off. Marianne had at first the advantage, but a false step brought her suddenly to the ground, and Margaret, unable to stop herself to assist her, was involuntarily hurried along, and reached the bottom in safety.

A gentleman carrying a gun, with two pointers playing round him, was passing up the hill and within a few yards of Marianne, when her accident happened. He put down his gun and ran to her assistance. She had raised herself from the ground, but her foot had been twisted in the fall, and she was scarcely able to stand. The gentleman offered his services, and perceiving that her modesty declined what her situation rendered necessary, took her up in his arms without farther delay, and carried her down the hill. Then passing through the garden, the gate of which had been left open by Margaret, he bore her directly into the house, whither Margaret was just arrived, and quitted not his hold till he had seated her in a chair in the parlour.

Elinor and her mother rose up in amazement at their entrance, and while the eyes of both were fixed on him with an evident wonder and a secret admiration which equally sprung from his appearance, he apologized for his intrusion by relating its cause, in a manner so frank and so graceful, that his person, which was uncommonly handsome, received additional charms from his voice and expression. Had he been even old, ugly, and vulgar, the gratitude and kindness of Mrs. Dashwood would have been secured by any act of attention to her child; but the influence of youth, beauty, and elegance, gave an interest to the action which came home to her feelings.

Later on in her letter, Jane Austen describes a party that Henry and Eliza were giving for friends – it gives us a delicious insight into her world.

At half-past seven arrived the musicians in two hackney coaches, and by eight the lordly company began to appear. Among the earliest were George and Mary Cooke, and I spent the greater part of the evening very pleasantly with them. The drawing-room being soon hotter than we liked, we placed ourselves in the connecting passage, which was comparatively cool, and gave us all the advantage of the music at a pleasant distance, as well as that of the first view of every new comer.

I was quite surrounded by acquaintances, especially gentlemen; and what with Mr. Hampson, Mr. Seymour, Mr. W. Knatchbull, Mr. Guillemarde, Mr. Cure, a Captain Simpson, brother to the Captain Simpson, besides Mr. Walter and Mr. Egerton, in addition to the Cookes, and Miss Beckford, and Miss Middleton, I had quite as much upon my hands as I could do.

Poor Miss B. has been suffering again from her old complaint, and looks thinner than ever. She certainly goes to Cheltenham the beginning of June. We were all delight and cordiality of course. Miss M. seems very happy, but has not beauty enough to figure in London.

Including everybody we were sixty-six – which was considerably more than Eliza had expected, and quite enough to fill the back drawing-room and leave a few to be scattered about in the other and in the passage.

The music was extremely good. It opened (tell Fanny) with “Poike de Parp pirs praise pof Prapela”; and of the other glees I remember, “In peace love tunes,” “Rosabelle,” “The Red Cross Knight,” and “Poor Insect.” Between the songs were lessons on the harp, or harp and pianoforte together; and the harp-player was Wiepart, whose name seems famous, though new to me. There was one female singer, a short Miss Davis, all in blue, bringing up for the public line, whose voice was said to be very fine indeed; and all the performers gave great satisfaction by doing what they were paid for, and giving themselves no airs. No amateur could be persuaded to do anything.

The house was not clear till after twelve. If you wish to hear more of it, you must put your questions, but I seem rather to have exhausted than spared the subject.

Willoughby’s Return is to be published officially tomorrow. If Jane was half as excited about her publication she must have been happy indeed!

Illustrations:
Jane Austen, Henry Austen by Jane Odiwe
Title page of Sense and Sensibility

Read Full Post »

P and P Tours!

It’s always lovely to go visiting places associated with Jane – what a brilliant idea to turn a hobby you love into an activity that will give others pleasure too. I’m very tempted by the tours offered on the P&P Tours website, and now their newsletter is tempting me even more.

Why not give a P&P Tours voucher as the perfect Christmas gift? Delivered in gift vellum with a letter from Jane herself and tied with ribbon, each comes with a complimentary upgrade to a Darcy, or Lady Catherine package – or an equivalent superior on our other tours. Redeemable until December 2012. Priced from £25 up to as much as you like! There’s even a chance to win £100 off the next tour! Visit the website and e-mail for a subscription to the newsletter for more details.

Never mind the P&P tour, I’d love to go on the Sense and Sensibility tour! Do you think if I drop enough hints, the lovely ladies Helen Wilkinson and Maddy Hall who run these splendid tours might invite me along one of the days? I can always be available for a reading in Bath!

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I’ve been having a lovely time visiting the blogs of Lori Hedgpeth Psychotic State blogspot and Mandi Schreiner Smexy Books

Click the links above to read their interviews!

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I’ve been having a lovely time visiting the blogs of Lori Hedgpeth Psychotic State blogspot and Mandi Schreiner Smexy Books

Click the links above to read their interviews!

Read Full Post »

Thank you to Barbara, Bella, and Mandi, who have taken the time to read and review Willoughby’s Return on their blogs. I’m looking forward to their interviews!


Everything Victorian and More…
In this new sequel to Sense and Sensibility, Ms. Odiwe has captured Jane Austen’s style with ease and eloquence, making this book a rare reading delight.

A Bibliophile’s Bookshelf

I openly admit that I’m a Pride and Prejudice fan. I know Pride and Prejudice inside out, and it is one of my most beloved books in my bookcase. Having said that I do have a soft spot for Jane Austen’s other novels, and in particular to the tale of Sense and Sensibility. Of all of Jane Austen’s heroine’s Elinor Dashwood is right up there alongside Eliza Bennet as one of my favorites.

Imagine my delight when I was asked to review an upcoming sequel to Sense and Sensibility called Willoughby’s Return by the lovely Jane Odiwe. A chance to dive back into the sweet story of Sense and Sensibility, with the impetuous Marianne and the strong, beautiful Elinor. Of course I had to say yes, and thus started a wonderful reading journey back into the world of the Dashwoods.

Willoughby’s Return sets the scene three years after Sense and Sensibility, and sees Marianne and Elinor happily married, with a few bumps in the road occurring when John Willoughby re-enters their lives.

Jane Odiwe writes with such eloquence and style that you can’t be helped for thinking that you are reading a Jane Austen book, but no it is definitely Jane Odiwe’s name on the cover!

In characters, plot and style, Willoughby’s Return is so beautifully written, that there is barely a seam between Sense and Sensibilty and Willoughby’s Return.

Despite the premise on the back-cover, this story centers more around Margaret Dashwood, as Marianne plays matchmaker and tries to set her up with the wealthy Henry Lawrence.

I loved the plot, and the way that Margaret is cast into the spotlight. For me, it kept the storyline fresh and interesting, and between Margaret and Marianne I was glued right through to the last pages.

This is Jane Odiwe’s second book, and it is clear that her skills as a writer are developing and becoming better and better. I thoroughly enjoyed Willoughby’s Return and will definitely be keeping my eyes peeled for her next novel.

Smexy Books

Willoughby’s Return is a delightful tale that swept me away for the time I was reading. For those who are looking to return to the Austen world with a very sweet story, I definitely recommend this book.

Read Full Post »

Thank you to Barbara, Bella, and Mandi, who have taken the time to read and review Willoughby’s Return on their blogs. I’m looking forward to their interviews!


Everything Victorian and More…
In this new sequel to Sense and Sensibility, Ms. Odiwe has captured Jane Austen’s style with ease and eloquence, making this book a rare reading delight.

A Bibliophile’s Bookshelf

I openly admit that I’m a Pride and Prejudice fan. I know Pride and Prejudice inside out, and it is one of my most beloved books in my bookcase. Having said that I do have a soft spot for Jane Austen’s other novels, and in particular to the tale of Sense and Sensibility. Of all of Jane Austen’s heroine’s Elinor Dashwood is right up there alongside Eliza Bennet as one of my favorites.

Imagine my delight when I was asked to review an upcoming sequel to Sense and Sensibility called Willoughby’s Return by the lovely Jane Odiwe. A chance to dive back into the sweet story of Sense and Sensibility, with the impetuous Marianne and the strong, beautiful Elinor. Of course I had to say yes, and thus started a wonderful reading journey back into the world of the Dashwoods.

Willoughby’s Return sets the scene three years after Sense and Sensibility, and sees Marianne and Elinor happily married, with a few bumps in the road occurring when John Willoughby re-enters their lives.

Jane Odiwe writes with such eloquence and style that you can’t be helped for thinking that you are reading a Jane Austen book, but no it is definitely Jane Odiwe’s name on the cover!

In characters, plot and style, Willoughby’s Return is so beautifully written, that there is barely a seam between Sense and Sensibilty and Willoughby’s Return.

Despite the premise on the back-cover, this story centers more around Margaret Dashwood, as Marianne plays matchmaker and tries to set her up with the wealthy Henry Lawrence.

I loved the plot, and the way that Margaret is cast into the spotlight. For me, it kept the storyline fresh and interesting, and between Margaret and Marianne I was glued right through to the last pages.

This is Jane Odiwe’s second book, and it is clear that her skills as a writer are developing and becoming better and better. I thoroughly enjoyed Willoughby’s Return and will definitely be keeping my eyes peeled for her next novel.

Smexy Books

Willoughby’s Return is a delightful tale that swept me away for the time I was reading. For those who are looking to return to the Austen world with a very sweet story, I definitely recommend this book.

Read Full Post »

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