Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Edward and Elizabeth Austen’ Category

In 1799 Jane Austen travelled to Bath with her mother, brother Edward and his wife, Elizabeth. The following is an extract from a letter she wrote to her sister.

I saw some gauzes in a shop in Bath Street yesterday at only 4d. a yard, but they were not so good or so pretty as mine. Flowers are very much worn, and fruit is still more the thing. Elizabeth has a bunch of strawberries, and I have seen grapes, cherries, plums, and apricots. There are likewise almonds and raisins, French plums, and tamarinds at the grocers’, but I have never seen any of them in hats. A plum or greengage would cost three shillings; cherries and grapes about five, I believe, but this is at some of the dearest shops. My aunt has told me of a very cheap one, near Walcot Church, to which I shall go in quest of something for you. I have never seen an old woman at the pump-room.

Elizabeth has given me a hat, and it is not only a pretty hat, but a pretty style of hat too. It is something like Eliza’s, only, instead of being all straw, half of it is narrow purple ribbon. I flatter myself, however, that you can understand very little of it from this description. Heaven forbid that I should ever offer such encouragement to explanations as to give a clear one on any occasion myself! But I must write no more of this. . .

I imagined Jane rushing around the shops looking for adornments for her bonnet and painted her striding along Bath Street, against a backdrop of gossips catching up with the latest news.

Here is another photo of yours truly standing in front of the Pump Rooms. You can just glimpse a magnificent chandelier through the window.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

In 1799 Jane Austen travelled to Bath with her mother, brother Edward and his wife, Elizabeth. The following is an extract from a letter she wrote to her sister.

I saw some gauzes in a shop in Bath Street yesterday at only 4d. a yard, but they were not so good or so pretty as mine. Flowers are very much worn, and fruit is still more the thing. Elizabeth has a bunch of strawberries, and I have seen grapes, cherries, plums, and apricots. There are likewise almonds and raisins, French plums, and tamarinds at the grocers’, but I have never seen any of them in hats. A plum or greengage would cost three shillings; cherries and grapes about five, I believe, but this is at some of the dearest shops. My aunt has told me of a very cheap one, near Walcot Church, to which I shall go in quest of something for you. I have never seen an old woman at the pump-room.

Elizabeth has given me a hat, and it is not only a pretty hat, but a pretty style of hat too. It is something like Eliza’s, only, instead of being all straw, half of it is narrow purple ribbon. I flatter myself, however, that you can understand very little of it from this description. Heaven forbid that I should ever offer such encouragement to explanations as to give a clear one on any occasion myself! But I must write no more of this. . .

I imagined Jane rushing around the shops looking for adornments for her bonnet and painted her striding along Bath Street, against a backdrop of gossips catching up with the latest news.

Here is another photo of yours truly standing in front of the Pump Rooms. You can just glimpse a magnificent chandelier through the window.

Read Full Post »