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Archive for the ‘Lacock’ Category

Pictures from Lacock – the pretty, typically English village that has been used so many times in Jane Austen adaptations. I thought I’d show you some of the less familiar scenes away from the main street.
Lacock has been used in many BBC productions and films – when I visited, the locals in the teashop told me about their experiences as extras which sounded great fun! Lacock was used in the lovely 1995 version of Pride and Prejudice for the town of Meryton. Here’s how Jane Austen first introduces Meryton.

The village of Longbourn was only one mile from Meryton; a most convenient distance for the young ladies, who were usually tempted thither three or four times a week, to pay their duty to their aunt and to a milliner’s shop just over the way. The two youngest of the family, Catherine and Lydia, were particularly frequent in these attentions; their minds were more vacant than their sisters’, and when nothing better offered, a walk to Meryton was necessary to amuse their morning hours and furnish conversation for the evening; and however bare of news the country in general might be, they always contrived to learn some from their aunt. At present, indeed, they were well supplied both with news and happiness by the recent arrival of a militia regiment in the neighbourhood; it was to remain the whole winter, and Meryton was the headquarters.

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Pictures from Lacock – the pretty, typically English village that has been used so many times in Jane Austen adaptations. I thought I’d show you some of the less familiar scenes away from the main street.
Lacock has been used in many BBC productions and films – when I visited, the locals in the teashop told me about their experiences as extras which sounded great fun! Lacock was used in the lovely 1995 version of Pride and Prejudice for the town of Meryton. Here’s how Jane Austen first introduces Meryton.

The village of Longbourn was only one mile from Meryton; a most convenient distance for the young ladies, who were usually tempted thither three or four times a week, to pay their duty to their aunt and to a milliner’s shop just over the way. The two youngest of the family, Catherine and Lydia, were particularly frequent in these attentions; their minds were more vacant than their sisters’, and when nothing better offered, a walk to Meryton was necessary to amuse their morning hours and furnish conversation for the evening; and however bare of news the country in general might be, they always contrived to learn some from their aunt. At present, indeed, they were well supplied both with news and happiness by the recent arrival of a militia regiment in the neighbourhood; it was to remain the whole winter, and Meryton was the headquarters.

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North Parade, Bath, which was used for Mrs Smith’s lodgings in the 1995 Persuasion adaptation.

The view down the long drive to the gorgeous house, Luckington Court, which was used in the 1995 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

Thatched cottages in Lacock – the pretty village used in the 1995 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

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North Parade, Bath, which was used for Mrs Smith’s lodgings in the 1995 Persuasion adaptation.

The view down the long drive to the gorgeous house, Luckington Court, which was used in the 1995 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

Thatched cottages in Lacock – the pretty village used in the 1995 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

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On my visit to Lacock I visited the Abbey grounds – unfortunately the house was still closed, but the gardens were very beautiful – drifts of crocus and snowdrops carpeting the grass. It was fun spotting all the places I’d seen in the cloisters in Pride and Prejudice (Wickham behaving disreputably at University) and in the Harry Potter films. The exhibition on early photography was fascinating and there is a good selection of books in the bookshop to tempt!

From the National Trust: The Abbey sits at the heart of Lacock village. It was founded in 1232 and converted into a country house c.1540. The atmospheric monastic rooms include medieval cloisters, a sacristy and chapter house and have survived largely intact. They have featured in two Harry Potter films, plus the recent The Other Boleyn Girl. The handsome 16th-century stable courtyard houses a clockhouse, brewery and bakehouse.

The pioneering photographic achievements of William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-77), who invented the negative/positive process, can be experienced in the Fox Talbot Museum. His descendants gave the Abbey and village to the Trust in 1944. A stroll through the Abbey’s Victorian woodland grounds reveals a stunning display of flowers in spring and magnificent trees, while the Botanic Garden reflects the plant collections of Fox Talbot – for whom botany was a lifelong scientific interest.

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I can think of nothing nicer on a cold February day than sitting in a teashop by a log fire and partaking of a cream tea. I visited King John’s Hunting Lodge which is the oldest house in Lacock and found perfection. If you have an idea of what you might expect from an English teashop, a visit here will not disappoint. According to their web site, ‘the main part of the lodge, dating back to the 13th century, still has much of the original cruck beam structure, whilst the rear of the building was added to in Tudor times. King John (1167 – 1216), Lord of the Manor of Melksham, frequently indulged his passion for hunting in the surrounding forest, and it is likely that he made regular visits to his Hunting Lodge.’

The lovely dresser filled with blue and white china groaned with cakes of all kinds: chocolate confections, plump Victoria sponges, fruit slabs and coffee cake studded with crisp walnuts.
I love old china and there is plenty on display on shelves and behind glass; pretty floral cups and saucers in delicate hues.

Tea, savouries, scones and cake are served in willow pattern blue and white – we quenched our thirst with lashings of ginger beer before fragrant cups of Earl Grey. The savouries were delicious as was the cream tea etc. Apart from the lovely ambience and decorations the staff are so friendly and cheerful – they seemed run off their feet, but went out of their way to make sure everyone was happy.
I didn’t set out for this to sound like a review, but it was the highlight of my visit to Lacock!

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I can think of nothing nicer on a cold February day than sitting in a teashop by a log fire and partaking of a cream tea. I visited King John’s Hunting Lodge which is the oldest house in Lacock and found perfection. If you have an idea of what you might expect from an English teashop, a visit here will not disappoint. According to their web site, ‘the main part of the lodge, dating back to the 13th century, still has much of the original cruck beam structure, whilst the rear of the building was added to in Tudor times. King John (1167 – 1216), Lord of the Manor of Melksham, frequently indulged his passion for hunting in the surrounding forest, and it is likely that he made regular visits to his Hunting Lodge.’

The lovely dresser filled with blue and white china groaned with cakes of all kinds: chocolate confections, plump Victoria sponges, fruit slabs and coffee cake studded with crisp walnuts.
I love old china and there is plenty on display on shelves and behind glass; pretty floral cups and saucers in delicate hues.

Tea, savouries, scones and cake are served in willow pattern blue and white – we quenched our thirst with lashings of ginger beer before fragrant cups of Earl Grey. The savouries were delicious as was the cream tea etc. Apart from the lovely ambience and decorations the staff are so friendly and cheerful – they seemed run off their feet, but went out of their way to make sure everyone was happy.
I didn’t set out for this to sound like a review, but it was the highlight of my visit to Lacock!

Read Full Post »

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