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Archive for the ‘Lambton’ Category

The dining room was used for a scene at the inn at Lambton in the 2005 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice. It is quite a small room which would have been used by the family for their private quarters. The plaster ceiling dates from the early 1500s and is decorated with a Tudor rose and Talbot dog in recognition of Sir Henry Vernon’s marriage to Anne Talbot.
In the window recess are carved figures in the oak panelling – these are thought to be Queen Elizabeth of York and her husband King Henry V11. I loved the windows at Haddon with their beautiful examples of early stained glass.

Here is a photo of the ceiling showing the Talbot dog device.

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Here are some more photos from my trip to Bakewell. The first shows a view of the church and the second shows some of the shops in the town.

This small market town was known as Badequelle in the time of the Domesday survey, which is a reference to the mineral springs and an ancient bath in the vicinity. The name was later corrupted to Baquelle before it became Bakewell, the name that we recognise today. In the parish churchyard of All Saints there is the remains of an old Saxon cross, which has an interesting legend attached to it. In 1501 Arthur, Prince of Wales, son of King Henry VII was visiting Sir Henry Vernon at Haddon Hall. Beneath the cross he saw a woman in white who predicted an early marriage and early death for him. When the Prince returned to Haddon he heard that his Spanish bride-to-be was in England and that he was to be married immediately. Four months later he became ill and breathed his dying words: ‘O, the vision of the cross at Haddon!’

I love this extract from Pride and Prejudice when Mr Darcy arrives in Lambton with his sister. Mrs Gardiner must have felt very excited for Lizzy as it becomes apparent that her niece is being sought out by the most powerful man in the district.

Elizabeth had settled it that Mr Darcy would bring his sister to visit her the very day after her reaching Pemberley; and was consequently resolved not to be out of sight of the inn the whole of that morning. But her conclusion was false; for on the very morning after their own arrival at Lambton these visitors came. They had been walking about the place with some of their new friends, and were just returned to the inn to dress themselves for dining with the same family, when the sound of a carriage drew them to a window, and they saw a gentleman and lady in a curricle driving up the street. Elizabeth, immediately recognising the livery, guessed what it meant, and imparted no small degree of surprise to her relations by acquainting them with the honour which she expected. Her uncle and aunt were all amazement; and the embarrassment of her manner as she spoke, joined to the circumstance itself, and many of the circumstances of the preceding day, opened to them a new idea on the business. Nothing had ever suggested it before, but they now felt that there was no other way of accounting for such attentions from such a quarter than by supposing a partiality for their niece. While these newly born notions were passing in their heads, the perturbation of Elizabeth’s feelings was every moment increasing.

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I’ve started a new book – well, I’ve written a synopsis and a couple of chapters and am feeling really excited at the prospect of immersing myself in the world of another Jane Austen sequel. It does feel like escaping to another existence, albeit a fantasy one, and I must admit, I did have more than a little chuckle at the first episode of ‘Lost in Austen’, because I could identify so well with with the heroine, (even if we know deep inside that we all much prefer the time we live in). Of course nothing can equal Jane Austen’s writing, but we sequel writers are compelled to carry on with the lives of her characters, inventing new stories, even if we know they are not exactly what she might have chosen to write about herself. Can we have too much Pride and Prejudice? I don’t think so, or for that matter, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey or Persuasion.

On my northern tour with my sister, (well, it was just a long weekend really,) we stayed in an old coaching inn at Bakewell. Many people think that Bakewell was the inspiration for Lambton, where Lizzy Bennet stays with her aunt and uncle Gardiner when travelling through the peak district and where she starts to see Mr Darcy (or Pemberley) in a different light. The Rutland Arms, where I stayed, has a room which they claim Jane Austen stayed in. I don’t know whether the evidence for this is very strong, but it’s a lovely idea. As a surprise my sister booked us in for my birthday treat. The top photo shows the view of Bakewell from our window and below is the scene in the reception sitting room, which inspired a breakfast room scene in my own Lydia Bennet’s Story. Doesn’t it look cosy? We travelled in late November; I remember sparkling, frosty days, blue skies and mists in the valley- and sitting by a roaring fire when inside – perfect!

In 1835, Bakewell was described in Pigot and Co’s Commercial Directory for Derbyshire: Bakewell is an ancient town, situate at the foot of a hill, on the western bank of the river Wye, whose stream abounds with trout and other fish affording ample reward to the patience of the angler; while the rich and romantic scenery, enhanced in beauty by the noble appearance of wood-clad hills, present strong and almost not to be resisted inducements, to the visitors of Buxton and Matlock, to tarry a time in this vicinity.

We certainly had a lovely time, sampling the delights of the landscape and the famous Bakewell Pudding!

Read Full Post »

I’ve started a new book – well, I’ve written a synopsis and a couple of chapters and am feeling really excited at the prospect of immersing myself in the world of another Jane Austen sequel. It does feel like escaping to another existence, albeit a fantasy one, and I must admit, I did have more than a little chuckle at the first episode of ‘Lost in Austen’, because I could identify so well with with the heroine, (even if we know deep inside that we all much prefer the time we live in). Of course nothing can equal Jane Austen’s writing, but we sequel writers are compelled to carry on with the lives of her characters, inventing new stories, even if we know they are not exactly what she might have chosen to write about herself. Can we have too much Pride and Prejudice? I don’t think so, or for that matter, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, Mansfield Park, Northanger Abbey or Persuasion.

On my northern tour with my sister, (well, it was just a long weekend really,) we stayed in an old coaching inn at Bakewell. Many people think that Bakewell was the inspiration for Lambton, where Lizzy Bennet stays with her aunt and uncle Gardiner when travelling through the peak district and where she starts to see Mr Darcy (or Pemberley) in a different light. The Rutland Arms, where I stayed, has a room which they claim Jane Austen stayed in. I don’t know whether the evidence for this is very strong, but it’s a lovely idea. As a surprise my sister booked us in for my birthday treat. The top photo shows the view of Bakewell from our window and below is the scene in the reception sitting room, which inspired a breakfast room scene in my own Lydia Bennet’s Story. Doesn’t it look cosy? We travelled in late November; I remember sparkling, frosty days, blue skies and mists in the valley- and sitting by a roaring fire when inside – perfect!

In 1835, Bakewell was described in Pigot and Co’s Commercial Directory for Derbyshire: Bakewell is an ancient town, situate at the foot of a hill, on the western bank of the river Wye, whose stream abounds with trout and other fish affording ample reward to the patience of the angler; while the rich and romantic scenery, enhanced in beauty by the noble appearance of wood-clad hills, present strong and almost not to be resisted inducements, to the visitors of Buxton and Matlock, to tarry a time in this vicinity.

We certainly had a lovely time, sampling the delights of the landscape and the famous Bakewell Pudding!

Read Full Post »