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Archive for the ‘Peak District’ Category

The chapel at Haddon Hall was used in the 2005 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice starring Keira Knightley and Matthew Macfadyen. It’s a marvellous example of an early chapel with separate seating for the gentry, wall frescoes, and 15th century painted glass. The south aisle dates from the 12th century and was widened during the 15th century when the north aisle was added. The atmosphere in such a place is incredible, you can almost hear the walls breathing and catch the scent of an Elizabethan lavender pomander. The air reverberates with a sense of the past and images of ladies in stiff brocade with pointed bodices and narrow frills about their necks loom before you on herb strewn flagstones vanishing into the shadows as quickly as they appear. It is still the parish church of Nether Haddon which is one of the smallest parishes in the country. The high-sided oak pews are probably date from the 15th century and were for the family and their guests. Covering the walls are some beautiful paintings, which it is believed would once have been highly coloured. As we were looking round the chapel a party came in with one of the guides. She told us that the marble effigy of a young boy is of Robert Charles John Manners, Lord Haddon, the son of the 8th Duke of Rutland. As the eldest son he should have inherited Haddon but sadly died at the age of nine in 1894. Most poignantly, they tuck him up at night with a blanket and say goodnight to this day!

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I’ve been to Derbyshire for a few days on a research trip – (that’s my excuse anyway) with my lovely sister, her husband and my own. Derbyshire, of course, is home to Mr Darcy at Pemberley, and I wanted to see the landscape through Elizabeth Bennet’s eyes if that was possible and to see if I could find Pemberley. I’ve tried to do this before and have never really found anywhere I thought fitted exactly what I imagine to be Elizabeth and Darcy’s home, but wandering around places like Chatsworth and Haddon Hall is always a delight and very inspiring for my writing. I did see Mr Darcy – sort of – but I’ll tell you about that later.
As I travelled through the Peak District it was easy to see why people still flock to this area for the splendid scenery and vast landscapes which are stunningly beautiful. On our first day we arrived at Beeley where we were going to stay in the Devonshire Arms which is still a part of the Chatsworth Estate and within walking distance of the great house itself. Everyone we encountered was so friendly and the warm reception from the staff made our visit such a pleasure.
Here’s an extract from Discover Derbyshire and the Peak District about the village of Beeley.

Beeley is a pretty, unspoilt village sheltered by Beeley Moor with wonderful views in all directions.

But things could have been very different. The old road to Chatsworth used to go through the heart of the village. It left by Pig Lane, so named because of a group of pigsties by the side of the road and crossing James Paine’s, Single Arch Bridge. Before the completion of the bridge in 1761, traffic crossed Mill Bridge, near the old ruined mill buildings in Chatsworth Park. Fortunately for Beeley, it has had a bypass for over a hundred years, effectively shutting out all the hustle and bustle of the Chatsworth traffic hurrying along the winding road. Most motorists hardly give the village a passing glance, which even to this day remains quiet, peaceful and relatively undiscovered.

It was only after the third Duke of Devonshire had bought Beeley Hill Top in 1747 that his successor embarked upon a grand plan to develop and landscape Chatsworth. Beeley then started to become part of the estate. Land and buildings were purchased as they came on the market, but this task took some time and was completed by the sixth Duke. Many of the properties have been sold off into private ownership in recent years as they became surplus to requirements.

Beeley had acquired its present shape and size by 1800. With the exception of a small group of properties built in recent years on the Chesterfield Road, it has remained remarkably unchanged for over 200 years. The same does not apply to the use of the buildings: the school, schoolhouse, post office and reading room are all now private houses. Dukes Barn built in 1791, to house the estate carts used to carry coal from Rowsley Station, is now a residential study centre, and available for hire by any educational group.

What makes the village so beautiful is that almost all the farm and domestic buildings are built from the same honey coloured sandstone, quarried locally close to Fallinge Edge. The local stone quarries once gave employment to a large number of men. The two quarries at Bruntwood produced stone not only of good appearance, but also of such hardwearing quality that it was used in many of the principal buildings in Manchester.

Many travel books featuring the Peak District do not mention the village, but do refer to Beeley Moor. On the heather clad moor, some 1,200 feet above sea level, are over 30 pre-historic barrows and cairns. Hob Hurst’s House is an unusual Bronze Age Barrow that attracts most attention. A small ring of five stones stands on a mound surrounded by a rectangular bank and ditch. When the barrow was excavated in 1853, scorched human bones were found and two pieces of lead ore. Various legends have sprung up including one that refers to ‘Hob’ as a kindly goblin who made his home in this barrow and gave assistance to the local community.

The delightful Beeley Brook enhances the village scene as it babbles its way cheerfully alongside the road, past the Devonshire Arms to a meeting with the River Derwent.

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I’ve been to Derbyshire for a few days on a research trip – (that’s my excuse anyway) with my lovely sister, her husband and my own. Derbyshire, of course, is home to Mr Darcy at Pemberley, and I wanted to see the landscape through Elizabeth Bennet’s eyes if that was possible and to see if I could find Pemberley. I’ve tried to do this before and have never really found anywhere I thought fitted exactly what I imagine to be Elizabeth and Darcy’s home, but wandering around places like Chatsworth and Haddon Hall is always a delight and very inspiring for my writing. I did see Mr Darcy – sort of – but I’ll tell you about that later.
As I travelled through the Peak District it was easy to see why people still flock to this area for the splendid scenery and vast landscapes which are stunningly beautiful. On our first day we arrived at Beeley where we were going to stay in the Devonshire Arms which is still a part of the Chatsworth Estate and within walking distance of the great house itself. Everyone we encountered was so friendly and the warm reception from the staff made our visit such a pleasure.
Here’s an extract from Discover Derbyshire and the Peak District about the village of Beeley.

Beeley is a pretty, unspoilt village sheltered by Beeley Moor with wonderful views in all directions.

But things could have been very different. The old road to Chatsworth used to go through the heart of the village. It left by Pig Lane, so named because of a group of pigsties by the side of the road and crossing James Paine’s, Single Arch Bridge. Before the completion of the bridge in 1761, traffic crossed Mill Bridge, near the old ruined mill buildings in Chatsworth Park. Fortunately for Beeley, it has had a bypass for over a hundred years, effectively shutting out all the hustle and bustle of the Chatsworth traffic hurrying along the winding road. Most motorists hardly give the village a passing glance, which even to this day remains quiet, peaceful and relatively undiscovered.

It was only after the third Duke of Devonshire had bought Beeley Hill Top in 1747 that his successor embarked upon a grand plan to develop and landscape Chatsworth. Beeley then started to become part of the estate. Land and buildings were purchased as they came on the market, but this task took some time and was completed by the sixth Duke. Many of the properties have been sold off into private ownership in recent years as they became surplus to requirements.

Beeley had acquired its present shape and size by 1800. With the exception of a small group of properties built in recent years on the Chesterfield Road, it has remained remarkably unchanged for over 200 years. The same does not apply to the use of the buildings: the school, schoolhouse, post office and reading room are all now private houses. Dukes Barn built in 1791, to house the estate carts used to carry coal from Rowsley Station, is now a residential study centre, and available for hire by any educational group.

What makes the village so beautiful is that almost all the farm and domestic buildings are built from the same honey coloured sandstone, quarried locally close to Fallinge Edge. The local stone quarries once gave employment to a large number of men. The two quarries at Bruntwood produced stone not only of good appearance, but also of such hardwearing quality that it was used in many of the principal buildings in Manchester.

Many travel books featuring the Peak District do not mention the village, but do refer to Beeley Moor. On the heather clad moor, some 1,200 feet above sea level, are over 30 pre-historic barrows and cairns. Hob Hurst’s House is an unusual Bronze Age Barrow that attracts most attention. A small ring of five stones stands on a mound surrounded by a rectangular bank and ditch. When the barrow was excavated in 1853, scorched human bones were found and two pieces of lead ore. Various legends have sprung up including one that refers to ‘Hob’ as a kindly goblin who made his home in this barrow and gave assistance to the local community.

The delightful Beeley Brook enhances the village scene as it babbles its way cheerfully alongside the road, past the Devonshire Arms to a meeting with the River Derwent.

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This first photo shows a view from an upstairs room at Brantwood where I was lucky enough to stay a few years ago. My husband and I were working on a project to do with the house which was Ruskin’s home in his latter years. The lovely window has an incredible view which looks out over Coniston water. Seeing this photo again made me think of Elizabeth Bennet and her travels with the Gardiners. The Lake District was very fashionable for touring parties and in Pride and Prejudice we learn that Elizabeth is looking forward very much to her holiday. But Elizabeth did not manage to get as far as the ‘rocks and mountains’ of the Lakes.

The time fixed for the beginning of their northern tour was now fast approaching, and a fortnight only was wanting of it, when a letter arrived from Mrs. Gardiner, which at once delayed its commencement and curtailed its extent. Mr. Gardiner would be prevented by business from setting out till a fortnight later in July, and must be in London again within a month; and as that left too short a period for them to go so far, and see so much as they had proposed, or at least to see it with the leisure and comfort they had built on, they were obliged to give up the Lakes, and substitute a more contracted tour, and, according to the present plan, were to go no farther northward than Derbyshire. In that county there was enough to be seen to occupy the chief of their three weeks; and to Mrs. Gardiner it had a peculiarly strong attraction. The town where she had formerly passed some years of her life, and where they were now to spend a few days, was probably as great an object of her curiosity as all the celebrated beauties of Matlock, Chatsworth, Dovedale, or the Peak.

Elizabeth was excessively disappointed; she had set her heart on seeing the Lakes, and still thought there might have been time enough. But it was her business to be satisfied – and certainly her temper to be happy; and all was soon right again.

With the mention of Derbyshire there were many ideas connected. It was impossible for her to see the word without thinking of Pemberley and its owner. “But surely,” said she, “I may enter his county with impunity, and rob it of a few petrified spars without his perceiving me.”

From here Pride and Prejudice and Elizabeth’s story gets more and more exciting. Of course Jane Austen couldn’t have Lizzy going off to the Lakes when she was intent on throwing her into the path of our favourite hero, Mr Darcy, but I can’t help wondering if they managed to visit the wonderful Lakes once they were married!

Click here to learn more about Brantwood

Read Full Post »

This first photo shows a view from an upstairs room at Brantwood where I was lucky enough to stay a few years ago. My husband and I were working on a project to do with the house which was Ruskin’s home in his latter years. The lovely window has an incredible view which looks out over Coniston water. Seeing this photo again made me think of Elizabeth Bennet and her travels with the Gardiners. The Lake District was very fashionable for touring parties and in Pride and Prejudice we learn that Elizabeth is looking forward very much to her holiday. But Elizabeth did not manage to get as far as the ‘rocks and mountains’ of the Lakes.

The time fixed for the beginning of their northern tour was now fast approaching, and a fortnight only was wanting of it, when a letter arrived from Mrs. Gardiner, which at once delayed its commencement and curtailed its extent. Mr. Gardiner would be prevented by business from setting out till a fortnight later in July, and must be in London again within a month; and as that left too short a period for them to go so far, and see so much as they had proposed, or at least to see it with the leisure and comfort they had built on, they were obliged to give up the Lakes, and substitute a more contracted tour, and, according to the present plan, were to go no farther northward than Derbyshire. In that county there was enough to be seen to occupy the chief of their three weeks; and to Mrs. Gardiner it had a peculiarly strong attraction. The town where she had formerly passed some years of her life, and where they were now to spend a few days, was probably as great an object of her curiosity as all the celebrated beauties of Matlock, Chatsworth, Dovedale, or the Peak.

Elizabeth was excessively disappointed; she had set her heart on seeing the Lakes, and still thought there might have been time enough. But it was her business to be satisfied – and certainly her temper to be happy; and all was soon right again.

With the mention of Derbyshire there were many ideas connected. It was impossible for her to see the word without thinking of Pemberley and its owner. “But surely,” said she, “I may enter his county with impunity, and rob it of a few petrified spars without his perceiving me.”

From here Pride and Prejudice and Elizabeth’s story gets more and more exciting. Of course Jane Austen couldn’t have Lizzy going off to the Lakes when she was intent on throwing her into the path of our favourite hero, Mr Darcy, but I can’t help wondering if they managed to visit the wonderful Lakes once they were married!

Click here to learn more about Brantwood

Read Full Post »