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Archive for the ‘Searching For Captain Wentworth Giveaway’ Category

Happy Birthday Jane Austen! Read below for one of my favourite JA excerpts, and for a chance to win some free books and a free download. Then hop over to the next blog on the list for more treats – see below for further details.

Thank you very much to Maria Grazia of My Jane Austen Book Club for hosting this splendid event!!! It’s wonderful to be a part of the Austen Soirée at My Jane Austen Book Club.

This was an impossible task – to find a passage from all of Jane Austen’s writing that could be described as my favourite. There are so many excerpts that I could pick – there truly isn’t one that I love above all others, but the following is particularly dear to my heart.

It’s from Persuasion – chapter 19. I love the way Jane Austen lets us into Anne’s head and we experience what Anne sees, hears and feels when she sees Captain Wentworth again.

   Mr. Elliot was attending his two cousins and Mrs. Clay. They were in Milsom Street. It began to rain, not much, but enough to make shelter desirable for women, and quite enough to make it very desirable for Miss Elliot to have the advantage of being conveyed home in Lady Dalrymple’s carriage, which was seen waiting at a little distance; she, Anne, and Mrs. Clay, therefore, turned into Molland’s, while Mr. Elliot stepped to Lady Dalrymple, to request her assistance. He soon joined them again, successful, of course: Lady Dalrymple would be most happy to take them home, and would call for them in a few minutes.

   Her ladyship’s carriage was a barouche, and did not hold more than four with any comfort. Miss Carteret was with her mother; consequently it was not reasonable to expect accommodation for all the three Camden Place ladies. There could be no doubt as to Miss Elliot. Whoever suffered inconvenience, she must suffer none, but it occupied a little time to settle the point of civility between the other two. The rain was a mere trifle, and Anne was most sincere in preferring a walk with Mr. Elliot. But the rain was also a mere trifle to Mrs. Clay; she would hardly allow it even to drop at all, and her boots were so thick! much thicker than Miss Anne’s; and, in short, her civility rendered her quite as anxious to be left to walk with Mr. Elliot as Anne could be, and it was discussed between them with a generosity so polite and so determined, that the others were obliged to settle it for them; Miss Elliot maintaining that Mrs. Clay had a little cold already, and Mr. Elliot deciding, on appeal, that his cousin Anne’s boots were rather the thickest.
   It was fixed, accordingly, that Mrs. Clay should be of the party in the carriage; and they had just reached this point, when Anne, as she sat near the window, descried, most decidedly and distinctly, Captain Wentworth walking down the street.
   Her start was perceptible only to herself; but she instantly felt that she was the greatest simpleton in the world, the most unaccountable and absurd! For a few minutes she saw nothing before her.: it was all confusion. She was lost, and when she had scolded back her senses, she found the others still waiting for the carriage, and Mr. Elliot (always obliging) just setting off for Union Street on a commission of Mrs. Clay’s.
   She now felt a great inclination to go to the outer door; she wanted to see if it rained. Why was she to suspect herself of another motive? Captain Wentworth must be out of sight. She left her seat, she would go; one half of her should not be always so much wiser than the other half, or always suspecting the other of being worse than it was. She would see if it rained. She was sent back, however, in a moment, by the entrance of Captain Wentworth himself, among a party of gentlemen and ladies, evidently his acquaintance, and whom he must have joined a little below Milsom Street. He was more obviously struck and confused by the sight of her than she had ever observed before; he looked quite red. For the first time since their renewed acquaintance, she felt that she was betraying the least sensibility of the two. She had the advantage of him in the preparation of the last few moments. All the overpowering, blinding, bewildering, first effects of strong surprise were over with her. Still, however, she had enough to feel! It was agitation, pain, pleasure — a something between delight and misery.
   He spoke to her, and then turned away. The character of his manner was embarrassment. She could not have called it either cold or friendly, or anything so certainly as embarrassed.
   After a short interval, however, he came towards her and spoke again. Mutual enquiries on common subjects passed: neither of them, probably, much the wiser for what they heard, and Anne continuing fully sensible of his being less at ease than formerly. They had, by dint of being so very much together, got to speak to each other with a considerable portion of apparent indifference and calmness; but he could not do it now. Time had changed him, or Louisa had changed him. There was consciousness of some sort or other. He looked very well, not as if he had been suffering in health or spirits, and he talked of Uppercross, of the Musgroves, nay, even of Louisa, and had even a momentary look of his own arch significance as he named her; but yet it was Captain Wentworth not comfortable, not easy, not able to feign that he was.
   It did not surprise, but it grieved Anne to observe that Elizabeth would not know him. She saw that he saw Elizabeth, that Elizabeth saw him, that there was complete internal recognition on each side; she was convinced that he was ready to be acknowledged as an acquaintance, expecting it, and she had the pain of seeing her sister turn away with unalterable coldness.
   Lady Dalrymple’s carriage, for which Miss Elliot was growing very impatient, now drew up; the servant came in to announce it. It was beginning to rain again, and altogether there was a delay, and a bustle, and a talking, which must make all the little crowd in the shop understand that Lady Dalrymple was calling to convey Miss Elliot. At last Miss Elliot and her friend, unattended but by the servant, (for there was no cousin returned), were walking off; and Captain Wentworth, watching them, turned again to Anne, and by manner, rather than words, was offering his services to her.
   “I am much obliged to you,” was her answer, “but I am not going with them. The carriage would not accommodate so many. I walk: I prefer walking.”
   “But it rains.”
   “Oh! very little. Nothing that I regard.”
   After a moment’s pause, he said: “Though I came only yesterday, I have equipped myself properly for Bath already, you see” (pointing to a new umbrella); “I wish you would make use of it, if you are determined to walk; though I think it would be more prudent to let me get you a chair.”
   She was very much obliged to him, but declined it all, repeating her conviction, that the rain would come to nothing at present, and adding, “I am only waiting for Mr. Elliot. He will be here in a moment, I am sure.”
   She had hardly spoken the words when Mr. Elliot walked in. Captain Wentworth recollected him perfectly. There was no difference between him and the man who had stood on the steps at Lyme, admiring Anne as she passed, except in the air and look and manner of the privileged relation and friend. He came in with eagerness, appeared to see and think only of her, apologised for his stay, was grieved to have kept her waiting, and anxious to get her away without further loss of time, and before the rain increased; and in another moment they walked off together, her arm under his, a gentle and embarrassed glance, and a “Good morning to you!” being all that she had time for, as she passed away.


Thank you for visiting me on this special day! In celebration I am offering my Persuasion-inspired book, Searching for Captain Wentworth as a free download from Amazon for today only! I am also offering several giveaways – please leave a comment on the appropriate post in order to take part.

Giveaway of a signed copy of Searching for Captain Wentworth

Giveaway of a copy of Mrs Hurst Dancing – an illustrated book by a young Regency lady, Diana Sperling.

Giveaway of an illustrated copy of Persuasion by Jane Austen

Giveaway of a copy of My Dear Cassandra: The illustrated letters of Jane Austen

Giveaway of a choice of one of my novels

All competitions open for today only – winners announced tomorrow, Monday, 17th December 2012.

Do visit the other blogs participating – I know there are some lovely treats on offer!

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Presenting: All I want for Christmas Giveaways!

I may not be able to supply any of the men above, but I am giving away Christmas goodies this week!

Today’s present is a copy of Searching for Captain Wentworth – please leave your name and a contact email below to be in with a chance to win! Open Internationally – winner announced Monday 17th December! Please come back tomorrow for another gift.

Happy Christmas!

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As promised, here’s Chapter Two of Searching for Captain Wentworth! I hope you enjoy it.

Our heroine Sophie has arrived in Bath but her Great Aunt Elizabeth’s flat is not quite what she’s been expecting and as she’s about to discover all is not as it first seems…

I am also thrilled to announce the winner of the signed copy of Searching for Captain Wentworth!

Congratulations Miss Lucinda Fountain – look out for an email from me in your inbox – I hope you enjoy the book!

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I’m on Victoria Connelly’s website today talking about the joys of Indie publishing and all about my new book, Searching for Captain Wentworth!

 I hope you’ll pop over there to see what I’ve got to say about self-publishing as well as fantastic authors like Talli Roland, Linda Gillard and Victoria Connelly herself. Victoria has a new novella out for Christmas, Christmas with Mr Darcy!



Competition! This week I’m giving away another paperback copy of Searching for Captain Wentworth

This competition is International and open to anyone who leaves a comment below in answer to the following question. 
Listen to the audio excerpt below of Chapter One from Searching for Captain Wentworth: 
Who writes a letter to Sophie inviting her to stay in the family house in Bath? 
Good Luck! The winner will be announced next Monday on October 15 2012.

I’m publishing some audio chapters through Soundcloud this week which I hope you will enjoy. Here’s Chapter One:

 Searching for Captain Wentworth by Jane Odiwe Chapter One by Jane Odiwe


Sydney Place, Bath – Jane Austen’s House

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The winner of the Austenesque Extravaganza Giveaway Competition is Samantha McNulty!

Congratulations! Please get in touch, Samantha, with your address details and I’ll pop a copy of Searching for Captain Wentworth in the post.

Thank you so much to everyone who left such lovely comments about the short story written by Juliet Archer and myself – we had great fun writing it.

Here’s a little audio Excerpt from Searching For Captain Wentworth by Jane Odiwe – I hope you enjoy it!

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Review by Nancy Kelley for Indie Jane –

Please visit to enter GIVEAWAY!

Persuasion is quite possibly my favorite of all Austen’s books, and Captain Wentworth is in a dead heat with Darcy for favorite literary hero of all time. With that background, it would be easy to think that any novel based on Persuasion would automatically win my good opinion, but the opposite is rather true. With something so beloved, I will only be swayed by a treatment that is truly superlative. I’m happy to say I was not disappointed in Searching for Captain Wentworth by Jane Odiwe.
There is so much to love about this book, it’s hard for me to express it clearly–so if I jump around a bit, please forgive me.
First, I love parallel story lines when they are woven together in such a way that they support each other. As Sophie jumps back and forth between the past and present, the things that have just happened to her in the other time inform her decisions where she is now. The two stories are really one story–Sophie’s story.
Second, one of the fun things about reading fiction is figuring out what the author’s other passions might be. When you read Searching for Captain Wentworth, it quickly becomes obvious that Jane Odiwe loves and knows art. She uses various paintings throughout the story as props to guide us into a deeper understanding of Jane, her times, and the story at hand.
Third, it is apparent right from the start of Searching for Captain Wentworth that she is intimately familiar with both Bath and Jane Austen. There is a vibrancy to her descriptions of the city that could not come from someone who did not love it dearly. Amazingly, her picture of Regency Bath is just as clear as the vision of modern Bath–and yes, there have been some changes over the last 200 years.
As for Austen… Ah, and here is where this book really grabbed my heart, reader. Since Jane Austen is actually a character in Searching for Captain Wentworth, one of the more delightful things in the novel was the way Jane Odiwe sprinkled names, situations, and quotes that one could easily see later went on to inspire our Jane in her works. If you are an author, you know that some of your best scenes are the ones you have either witnessed or experienced. Why wouldn’t the same be true for Austen?
Yes, yes. So the writing is fabulous, but what of the story? The story, at its heart, is a classic story of a young lady dissatisfied with her own life who manages to escape to a fantasy. The fact that her fantasy is actually history merely adds flavor. Will she allow herself to be sucked into the fantasy, leaving behind those who love her at home, or will she use the lessons she learns in the past to grow in the present?
loved the heroes in this book, both of them. The historical Wentworth was so very dashing and handsome, and the modern Frederick (Okay, Josh…) was gallant and chivalrous. I have to say, I’m really a little envious of Sophie, having the love of two such men!
In short, if you love Bath, art, romantic heroes, or Jane Austen, you will love this book.
Five Stars

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The Pump Room, Bath

Today I am the guest of Laura Hartness on the Calico Critic Blog. There’s an exclusive extract from Searching for Captain Wentworth and I’m talking about Time Travel and the books I loved as a child. I’d love to know which were your favourites – please leave a comment on her blog!

Yesterday, I was Maria Grazia’s guest and she interviewed me for My Jane Austen Book Club. If you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a signed paperback copy of Searching for Captain Wentworth do leave a comment!

The day before I was Laurel Ann Nattress’ guest on Austenprose where I shared an exclusive ‘audio’ excerpt from my new novel.

I’ve also been to visit Vic Sanborn on Jane Austen’s World – she celebrated 500,000 hits on her blog with a giveaway-competition now closed.

Tomorrow, I shall be visiting Nancy Kelley – I hope you can join me!

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