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Laurel Ann from the fabulous Austenprose blog has very kindly invited me to guest blog as part of her Pride and Prejudice without Zombies Group Read. If you’ve not been keeping up with all the fascinating posts do head on over there – there’s something of interest for all fans of Pride and Prejudice. I was thrilled when Laurel Ann asked me if I’d write about the main hero and heroine of the novel especially as I’ve just finished a continuation of Pride and Prejudice.

Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy are perhaps Jane Austen’s most beloved characters. Pride and Prejudice was written more than two hundred years ago, yet these characters remain as fresh and irresistibly fascinating to us as they were for the first generations that read their tale, and remain the standard by which all other characters in a love story are judged.
So, why do we love them so much? Jane Austen tells their story through Elizabeth’s eyes so it’s easy to identify with this heroine who is lively, witty, and loveable as much for her faults as for her charms. We identify with her because we feel she is like us. She is capable of making mistakes, but having realised her errors, she changes and grows as a result. We see her character develop as the story enfolds.
The first time we really meet Elizabeth it is at the Meryton Assembly where the proud Mr Darcy is also in attendance with his affable friend Mr Bingley. There is a lack of gentlemen at the ball, and Lizzy has to sit out for two dances. Mr Darcy is seen to be behaving in a particularly disagreeable manner. He only dances with Mr Bingley’s sisters and ignores everyone else in the room. Everyone has heard that he is a rich landowner, but his wealth and power coupled with his anti-social manners only serve to make him appear arrogant. He doesn’t seem to care that his words may be overheard or that his speech is insulting. In fact, he is almost goading Elizabeth whom he has heard described as a pretty girl. He actually makes sure that Lizzy is looking at him before he speaks. It’s almost as if he wants her to hear, and make her aware that he can attract, and have any woman in the room.
“She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; and I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.”
It’s a real put down, and as an unsurprising consequence, she dislikes him instantly!
At this stage, we also think he’s horrid, and I doubt there are many people who stop and wonder at the psychology behind his behaviour. It’s only when their relationship starts to develop that we think about the undeniable ‘chemistry’ between them, and question their attraction to one another from what seems such an unpromising start.
To our utter delight, Mr Darcy finds himself attracted to her even though he is determined to find fault with her, and when she refuses to stand up with him for a dance we rejoice at her opportunity for revenge. The lively banter that ensues between them is what makes their relationship so satisfying. In every respect, Elizabeth proves herself equal in intelligence. She is no simpering female. When they are thrown together at the Netherfield Ball, Darcy begins to enjoy Lizzy’s lively conversation and pert manners. Although she is determined to continue her dislike of him, she agrees to dance with him before she can help herself. The conversation that flies between them is an exercise in brilliant dialogue as each of them tries to better the other with a witty retort. Elizabeth is beginning to realize that however fixed her first impressions of Darcy seemed initially, her opinion of him is changing. She recognizes that they have similarities in their characters; they both like to think that they can use their intellect coupled with a wry sense of humour to win an argument or to make a point all meted out in an economy of language.
“It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy – I talked about the dance, and you ought to make some kind of remark on the size of the room, or the number of couples.”
He smiled, and assured her that whatever she wished him to say should be said. Very well. That reply will do for the present. Perhaps by and by I may observe that private balls are much pleasanter than public ones. But now we may be silent.”
“Do you talk by rule, then, while you are dancing?”
“Sometimes. One must speak a little, you know. It would look odd to be entirely silent for half an hour together; and yet for the advantage of some, conversation ought to be so arranged, as that they may have the trouble of saying as little as possible.”
“Are you consulting your own feelings in the present case, or do you imagine that you are gratifying mine?”
“Both,” replied Elizabeth archly; “for I have always seen a great similarity in the turn of our minds. We are each of an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to posterity with all the éclat of a proverb.”
“This is no very striking resemblance of your own character, I am sure,” said he. “How near it may be to mine, I cannot pretend to say. You think it a faithful portrait undoubtedly.

They behave for the most part as opposing forces that cannot help being attracted to the other. Elizabeth prides herself on reading the psychology of people – she likes to know what makes them tick. The infuriating thing is that she cannot make Darcy out, when she thinks she has the upper hand, he then seizes power to have the whip hand over Elizabeth.
Just as we imagine that the couple is warming toward one another, something happens to make Lizzy despise Mr Darcy even more. She witnesses his snubbing of Mr Wickham and when the latter claims that Darcy has mistreated him she dislikes him even more. Elizabeth is swayed by Mr Wickham’s charming manner and has no reason to doubt his word. Darcy’s general behaviour has prejudiced her view of him, and so she takes Wickham’s part.
One of the reasons we love Elizabeth is because she is fiercely independent and knows her own mind. When Mr Collins proposes, we know she should accept him, but she refuses to compromise on her principles being prepared to go against the wishes of her mother. Elizabeth knows her prospects to marry well are bleak due to her lack of a good dowry, and even though the likely outcome is that she will remain a spinster, she remains true to her beliefs unlike her friend Charlotte Lucas who ultimately marries Mr Collins. Elizabeth is determined to marry for love. We admire her because she is rebellious, but also because she recognizes her own faults.
Elizabeth is not impressed by Darcy’s wealth and position alone, his character is what interests her, and initially she thinks he is rather shallow when he judges women by their accomplishments alone. He obviously thinks no woman is worthy of his consideration unless she is ‘accomplished’ and when he says he knows of only a half dozen women like this Elizabeth retaliates.
“I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women. I rather wonder now at your knowing any.”
It is the continual sparring between Elizabeth and Darcy that we especially enjoy. One of them says something designed to provoke the other, and we wait with bated breath to hear their reaction. Darcy responds to Miss Bingley playing a Scotch air on the pianoforte by suggesting that Elizabeth might feel the impulse to dance a reel. Lizzy knows this is a veiled insult – he’s already mentioned that ‘every savage can dance’, and reels are generally danced by the lower orders.
Elizabeth replies, “…You wanted me, I know, to say ‘Yes,’ that you might have the pleasure of despising my taste; but I always delight in overthrowing those kind of schemes, and cheating a person of their premeditated contempt. I have, therefore, made up my mind to tell you, that I do not want to dance a reel at all – and now despise me if you dare.”
Of course, Mr Darcy does not dare.
In order to fully understand Elizabeth’s character we must know something of the expected manners and customs of the time. Young women led sheltered lives amongst family members and had little freedom. Lizzy loves walking around Meryton and the surrounding area unchaperoned which at the time would have been seen as most inappropriate behaviour for a young lady. Walking through mud and jumping over stiles to visit her sister at Netherfield would not have been deemed as the correct way to conduct herself.
Darcy’s character is a composition in contrasts. On the one hand he exhibits reservations about the behaviour of certain Bennet family members, but Elizabeth’s own individual quirkiness and her efforts to go against convention only intrigue him. He likes what he sees as her athleticism, and when Miss Bingley tries to make Elizabeth appear less worthy in his eyes by pointing out her muddy petticoat, and the fact that he would not let his sister tramp about alone in the countryside, his increasing attraction to Elizabeth is observed when he remarks that ‘her eyes were brightened by the exercise.’
Mr Darcy famously refers to Elizabeth’s ‘fine eyes’, and indeed, Jane Austen uses eyes in many instances to show the growing attraction between the couple. Here are a few instances:
Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of each were overspread with the deepest blush.

Elizabeth could not help observing, as she turned over some music books that lay on the instrument, how frequently Mr. Darcy’s eyes were fixed on her.

They were confined for the evening at different tables, and she had nothing to hope, but that his eyes were so often turned towards her side of the room, as to make him play as unsuccessfully as herself.
When Darcy realizes he is so in love with Elizabeth that there’s no turning back, he asks her to marry him. His proposal is ungracious; he declares he is going against his own sense in asking her to be his wife. Lizzy, in true fashion throws his words and proposal back at him saying she cannot return his feelings, and declares her anger at the way he treated Wickham.
“…from the first moment, I may almost say – of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form that groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immoveable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.”
We know that Elizabeth would be set up for life if she marries him but her principles are admirable. She is not going to marry a man simply because he is rich. She is prejudiced against him for the characteristics she deplores – his haughtiness, his pride, and because he has assumed that she will jump at the chance to be his wife. At this point Darcy is outraged. As far as he is concerned he thinks he is offering what any woman could possibly want to make their dreams come true – his estate at Pemberley, and his fortune. He also wants to put the record straight about Wickham. Darcy writes Elizabeth a letter, and this is an interesting illustration of his character. Why doesn’t he go and see her, to explain in person? Perhaps his pride prevents it. After all, she has rejected him. He may be good at a quick comeback, but he seems more reserved when it comes to expressing his feelings and thoughts. I think we begin to question whether his haughtiness is simply masking a real insecurity; perhaps he is reserved and a little shy in company. It maybe that his discomfort in society and his inability to be at ease in social situations makes him appear to be arrogant when this is not the case. We learn from Mrs Reynolds, his housekeeper, who has known him since he was a small boy that he is far from being an intimidating tyrant. She describes him as being good-natured, sweet-tempered and generous-hearted. Praise indeed!
In her turn, when Lizzy reads the letter with the explanation that Wickham tried to elope with Georgiana Darcy, her first impressions are questioned.
We see another side of Darcy when he and Elizabeth meet again at Pemberley. Mrs Reynolds’s warm appraisal, his changed manner, plus his beautiful house and grounds make Lizzy see him through new eyes. She is beginning to fall in love with him. He is pulling out all the stops to impress her. It’s clear he’s been thinking about what she said to him, and he is trying to change for the better. He is kind to her uncle and aunt, and does not display his former snobbishness toward them. Darcy goes out of his way to be sociable inviting them all to an evening party and introducing his sister.
After learning the truth about Wickham, Elizabeth realizes that there is always more than one way of looking at things. She comes to know the real Mr Darcy as he lets his guard down and when she discovers the quiet way in which he saves her sister Lydia from ruin hence making it possible for their eventual alliance, Elizabeth knows she has been wrong to judge him. Darcy falls in love eventually for all the right reasons – Elizabeth’s intelligence and lively ways have captivated him, and he enjoys the fact that she is not afraid of him or sycophantic toward him. They both change to suit the other because they really love one another unreservedly. Mr Darcy and Elizabeth both make mistakes, but try to put them right and because they admit to their shortcomings, we love them all the more!

Laurel Ann contributed this wonderful passage which shows so perfectly how Mr Darcy has changed for the better by the end of the novel. “Such I was, from eight to eight-and-twenty; and such I might still have been but for you, dearest, loveliest Elizabeth! What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You shewed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.” Mr. Darcy, Chapter 58

My novel, Mr Darcy’s Secret will be published by Sourcebooks in February, 2011. My editor just sent me the cover today which is beautiful – I’m so excited, and can’t wait to hold it in my hands!

After capturing the heart of the richest man in England, Elizabeth Darcy believes her happiness is complete until mysterious affairs involving Mr Darcy’s past, and concerns over his sister Georgiana’s own troubled path to happiness present Elizabeth with fresh challenges to test her integrity, honour, and sweet nature as she fights her old fears and feelings of pride and prejudice. However, nothing can daunt our sparkling and witty heroine or dim her sense of fun as Elizabeth and the powerful, compelling figure of Mr Darcy take centre stage in this romantic tale set against the dramatic backdrops of Regency Derbyshire and the Lakes amongst the characters we love so well.

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It’s officially publication day of Willoughby’s Return! Thank you to everyone who have sent me wishes of congratulation, I feel very honoured! Thanks also to Dominique Raccah, Deb Werksman, Danielle Jackson, and everyone at Sourcebooks for making another dream realised.

It’s always an anxious time waiting for the reviews to come in – this review from Booklist made my day!

Booklist
Issue: November 15, 2009
Willoughby’s Return.
Odiwe, Jane (Author)
Nov 2009. 352 p. Sourcebooks/Landmark, paperback, $14.99. (9781402222672)

Odiwe follows Lydia Bennet’s Story (2008), her sequel to Pride and Prejudice, with a sequel to Austen’s Sense and Sensibility. Marianne has settled nicely into life as wife and mother, although every so often she indulges in one of her infamous flights of sensibility. She is certain her husband, William, adores her, but has he gotten over his passion for his first love, whose portrait occupies a place of honor in their home? The arrival of William’s nephew Henry grants Marianne the opportunity to play matchmaker between Henry and her sister Margaret, but the return of John Willoughby to Dorsetshire is not welcome news because now Marianne faces the difficult decision of whether to remain true to the quietly dependable man who married her, or give in to temptation with the rogue who broke her heart. Odiwe’s elegantly stylish writing is seasoned with just the right dash of tart humor, and her latest literary endeavor is certain to delight both Austen devotees and Regency romance readers.
— John Charles

To celebrate publication there will be a fortnight of fun in November – interviews, competitions, quizzes, and giveaways of my book, not only on my blog, but on those participating on my tour.

Book Nerd Extraordinaire 2nd
Everything Victorian 3rd
Savvy, Verse and Wit 4th
A Bibliophile’s Bookshelf 5th
The Bookworm Blogspot 6th
Books Like Breathing9th
Jane Austen’s World 10th
Fresh Fiction12th
Love, Romance, Passion11th/13th

First up today is this painting of Marianne and Elinor, the two Dashwood sisters. I’ve painted a few different versions of these girls – I hope you can tell which is Marianne and which is Elinor!

In Willoughby’s Return, Elinor still has a trying time keeping her sister safe from her fits of sensibility, and now she also has Margaret to contend with who is of a very similar disposition.

If you’d like to win this watercolour painting by yours truly, please leave a comment below saying which is your favourite heroine from Sense and Sensibility and why! The competition is open worldwide (closes on November 14th) and the winner will be announced on Monday, November 16th.

Look out tomorrow for another Competition!

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My author copies have arrived! I can’t tell you how exciting it is when the box of books arrives – so much more thrilling because they have travelled 3963 miles to get here. I love the look of the book, it sounds silly, I know, but I can’t stop stroking the cover – Sourcebooks have the most wonderful book designers. Thank you, Brenden Hitt, for an amazing cover, I couldn’t have imagined anything as fabulous. Thank you very much to everyone at Sourcebooks – Dominique Raccah, Deb Werksman, Danielle Jackson, and to everyone else who has worked so hard to realise another of my dreams of seeing my work in print.
It’s always very strange to think as I sit in my little room, here in England, sending files through the internet to America on the other side of the world, that they will be turned into a book that I can hold in my hands.


My Sourcebooks publisher, Dominique Raccah, invited me and some of the author Sourcebooks authors to dinner at the Reform Club last week. It was a day where the rain lashed down relentlessly, so I was a bit damp when I arrived. However, just walking down Pall Mall was exciting enough in itself, the whole area is seeped in history, and as I walked past the scarlet-coated, busby-wearing soldiers guarding St. James’s Palace, I couldn’t help thinking of Pride and Prejudice, nor of how Lydia Bennet would have appreciated seeing the soldiers!

Do you remember the references to St. James’s Palace in P&P? Here’s one – Jane Austen is describing Sir William Lucas:

By nature inoffensive, friendly, and obliging, his presentation at St. James’s had made him courteous.

The Reform Club was founded in 1836, in Pall Mall, in the centre of what is often called London’s Clubland. The founders commissioned a leading architect of the day, Charles Barry, to build an imposing and palatial clubhouse. Opened in 1841, membership was restricted to those who pledged support for the Great Reform Act of 1832, and the many MPs and Whig peers among the early members developed the Club as the political headquarters of the Liberal Party.

The Reform Club is no longer associated with any particular political party, and now serves a purely social function. While the Club presents a chaste and stately appearance on the outside, inside it is richly flamboyant. Large portraits of Whig and Radical leaders of the nineteenth century reform movement are set in panels in the upper and lower floors of the atrium. The walls and columns are faced with marble and scagliola, an artificial marble, the secrets of whose manufacture have only been rediscovered in recent years. The colours are deep red and green, white, sienna, black and gold.

Dominique and her husband were the most lovely and gracious hosts, and I was very lucky to meet four authors whose work I admire very much – Elizabeth Chadwick, Jill Mansell, Helen Hollis and last, but by no means least, the lovely Monica Fairview who I know from blogging with the Historical Romance UK authors. Sadly, Amanda Grange could not join us – she was greatly missed! A lovely evening was had by all, and will be one of those I have safely stored in my memory box of special treasures!

Pictures and photos:

Willoughby’s Return
Monica Fairview, Jane Odiwe, Helen Hollis
Helen Hollis, Dominique Raccah, Elizabeth Chadwick, Jill Mansell
Reform Club
St. James’s Palace (old print)
Elizabeth Chadwick and Jill Mansell

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I’ve just been sent my full cover design for my new book Willoughby’s Return which I love. Here is the blurb on the back cover to give you a little flavour of what is to come! Willoughby’s Return will be published in November 2009 – to find out more please click here

An old lover is back,
determined to make trouble…
In Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, when Marianne
Dashwood marries Colonel Brandon, she puts her heartbreak
over dashing scoundrel John Willoughby behind her.
Three years later, Willoughby’s return throws Marianne
into a tizzy of painful memories and exquisite feelings
of uncertainty. Willoughby is as charming, as roguish,
and as much in love with her as ever. And the timing
couldn’t be worse—with Colonel Brandon away and
Willoughby determined to win her back, will Marianne find
the strength to save her marriage, or will the temptation of
a previous love be too powerful to resist?

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I’ve just received the cover from my editor at Sourcebooks for my new book Willoughby’s Return. I am absolutely thrilled, I think it’s gorgeous! Thank you to the designers who have worked on it, you’ve done a wonderful job, I don’t know how I shall manage to wait until November to hold a copy in my hands!
There’s more information about this book, Lydia Bennet’s Story and Effusions of Fancy on my website with extracts and some of my paintings.

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My friend Kathryn L Nelson is a very special guest on my blog today. Her book, Pemberley Manor, a new Sourcebooks edition, is to be released in April of 2009. Kathy tells us of her inspiration and about how she came to write her lovely book.

Lord, it makes me laugh to think of it…

I continue to require the services of a little pinch now and again to remind me that I’m not dreaming, that I have indeed written a sequel to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, that it has been published once, and now will be published again by Sourcebooks, all within my lifetime!

When the BBC and A&E created yet another production of Pride and Prejudice in 1995, it was as if I were seeing it for the first time. I don’t know if it was my age, my condition in life, or solely the excellence of the screenplay, directing, and acting, but I was suddenly caught up in Jane Austen’s world.

When I began to write the rambling story that eventually became Pemberley Manor, I was a partner in our family electrical contracting business, co-chair of the Parent Teacher Organization at my twelve-year-old son’s school, and the floor-covering store my sister and I owned was taking its final, fatal nose-dive. I suppose my adventure in writing could have been nothing more than an attempt to run away to another time and place for a long rest.

There was, of course, the allure of Colin Firth’s wet shirt and Jennifer Ehle’s fine eyes to tempt a middle-aged woman, twenty years married, into thoughts of romance. And there was my friend Jane Anderson who had her own fire burning and purchased first one and then a second set of tapes of the miniseries so we could make sure we hadn’t missed anything.

After several years of late-night writing, I had filled hundreds of pages of paper with words that made me laugh out loud, and I couldn’t shake the vision of the same actors, reassembled somewhere in the English countryside, speaking them before a camera. I wrote to the BBC and also to A&E to suggest it, and although they politely declined, I was encouraged to receive an answer back that included the phrase “an absorbing read from the very first page….” Well!

After a very brief foray into the agent/publisher-hunting business, I boxed up my lovely pages, put them under the bed, and got on with my life. But every once in a while I would pick up one of Jane’s novels or replay the tapes yet again, and a little longing would stir in me. It would not give me rest, and when I stumbled over the names of several other sequels to Austen’s novels, I became a woman obsessed.

In my first halting steps on the web, I managed to find Diana Birchall and her lovely sequel, Mrs Darcy’s Dilemma. She was a gracious mentor, sending me to her publisher, Egerton House, and introducing me to our own Jane Odiwe who was trying to publish a sequel herself, a sweet rendering of Lydia that has since become Lydia Bennet’s Story. The story of their encouragement and support is another tale, but it gave me to understand that the obsession to travel down the road with Jane Austen’s characters after she leaves them is one that is shared by an enormous number of people.

From this realization, it was a short step to the Jane Austen Society of North America. I was, at my first meeting, too nervous to admit that I had written a sequel. I still feel a blush when I mention the word to a devoted Austen fan, and I have to confess that had I not written one myself, I would have been the first to disparage the genre.

But there it is. I’ve done it and I can’t take it back. And I’ve discovered a world of both readers and writers who, in my opinion, flatter Jane Austen both by imitating her style and by treating her characters as if they never stopped living and growing.

And…I got to have both lunch and dinner at Jane Odiwe’s house, meet her amazing family and be treated like royalty. I highly recommend the writing of sequels. It throws one in the path of all the best people.

I just wanted to add that apart from getting to know Kathy and her charming book, Pemberley Manor, I’ve got to meet her gorgeous son, Nayef, and her friend Marian and husband Brian, who are those sort of lovely people you feel you’ve known forever.
I am loving that new cover, Kathy!

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The reviews are still coming in – I am very grateful for them all. I’d like to thank Michele for this one at Reader’s Respite

Lydia Bennet’s Story: A Sequel to Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Odiwe
Rating: 4 of 5 stars
Book Source: Sourcebooks, Inc.

It is my greatest desire to fall in love and catch myself a husband, yet, whilst I am truly proficient in the art of becoming enamoured, so far finding my partner in life eludes me, however vigilant I have been in the endeavor.
Lydia Bennet’s Story

As a true Jane Austen fan, I had until recently shunned all attempted “sequels” to any of Ms. Austen’s great works. Fearing disappointment, I did not want to sully what to me is the perfect novel: Pride and Prejudice. As it turns out, I need not have worried. The term “sequel,” I am happy to report, has no application whatsoever to Jane Odiwe’s delightful novel, Lydia Bennet’s Story.

The novel explores the life of Lydia, the youngest and arguably most insipid Bennet sister. What if Lydia wasn’t as vapid as many surmised? What if she was just a silly young girl who made the typical mistakes of the young?

Author Jane Odiwe, thankfully, makes no attempt to be Jane Austen. Writing in third person with occasional glimpses into Lydia’s diary, Odiwe brilliantly takes a supporting character from a classic tale and uniquely makes it her own. Lydia is presented as a normal teen-aged girl with normal teenage concerns and immaturity and the unfortunate luck to cross paths with that infamous 19th-century player, Mr Wickham. This doesn’t mean she isn’t endearing: quite the opposite. After all, it’s difficult not to identify with thoughts such as

Mr Wickham will NOT be forgiven for his behaviour, though I can think of nothing else, playing over the scene in my head with a different ending each time. I now know just how I should have behaved and what I should have said which is vexing in the extreme.
Lydia Bennet’s diary, Lydia Bennet’s Story

By the end of the story, Lydia’s actions were quite forgivable in my eyes. She made mistakes many of us can sympathize with, having made many of them ourselves, albeit in a different century. Over-weening pride – an allusion to the novel from which she springs – only compounds her misjudgments.

The underlying seriousness of the follies of youth notwithstanding, the novel is lighthearted enough for enjoyable read and I was quite pleased to discover that it may be considered a stand-alone story, meaning that one need not be an Austen aficionado nor even to have read Pride and Prejudice in order to enjoy this book. If, however, you are a serious Austen fan and are loath to try reading one of the many “sequels,” you can safely set aside that fear in this instance and sit down with a very enjoyable tale. Happy reading!

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